Zika Virus Is Not A Threat – Update

Out of the 4,783 suspected cases of microcephaly reported in Brazil, only 17 “had a relationship with zika virus.” A relationship?!?!

Out of the 4,783 suspected cases of microcephaly reported in Brazil, only 17 “had a relationship with zika virus.”

Looks scary enough, right? Don’t believe the hype.

On Feb. 2nd, according to O Estado de São Paulo, one of the major Sao Paulo newspapers, had this to say about the zika virus:

* As of January 30, 2015, 4,783 suspected cases of microcephaly were reported in Brazil.

* Of those, 3,670 suspected cases of microcephaly, covering the entire country of Brazil, are being investigated.

* Of those 3,670, 404 cases have been confirmed as microcephaly or “other alterations in the central nervous system” of babies.

* Of those 404 cases, 17 “had a relationship with zika virus.”

Notice the vagueness of the data being given versus what has been confirmed. 404 cases of microcephaly have been confirmed out of 3,670 suspected cases. Of those 404 cases of microcephaly, or “other alterations in the central nervous system,” 17 are somehow related to the zika virus. Nowhere does it say that the zika virus causes microcephaly. Even the “confirmed” cases of microcephaly could also not be microcephaly. This is not even news-worthy. Why are we being subjected to this non-event?

The zika virus is not know to cause microcephaly. Anything that can have a negative impact on the fetal brain during pregnancy can result in microcephaly; severe malnutrition, falling down stairs, a blow to the stomach, a toxic street drug or medical drug or vaccine or pesticide. To state that 17 babies with microcephaly had a relationship with zika virus means absolutely nothing.

The zika virus is simply not a threat. It was discovered in 1947 and causes a slight fever. That’s it. Everyone stay calm and ask yourselves why this non-threat is being hyped at this point in time.

Don't Believe The (Zika) Hype

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